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About Alzheimer disease


Ayan
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 Ayan
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It is quite often noticed that people with Alzheimer's disease live with the disease as if in rhythm: one day they are very weak and problematic, the next day they are in much better condition and the rhythm is quite stable, one day much better, the next day, much worse.

Is there any astrological explanation for this, why quite a number of people with Alzheimer's disease are fairly stable in such a rhythm that one day is a very poor condition, the next a much better condition, and then again a very poor condition?

Can Alzheimer's disease have a so-called pattern, which is why quite a lot of people tend to manifest themselves in this way - the condition changes as if in a regular cycle, one day much more difficult (may not understand the world) and the next day they understand, behave more or less adequately?

On November 3, 1906, a clinical psychiatrist and neuroanatomist, Alois Alzheimer, reported "A peculiar severe disease process of the cerebral cortex" to the 37th Meeting of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tubingen, He described a 50-year-old woman whom he had followed from her admission for paranoia, progressive sleep and memory disturbance, aggression, and confusion, until her death 5 years later. His report noted distinctive plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain histology. It excited little interest despite an enthusiastic response from Kraepelin, who promptly included "Alzheimer's disease" in the 8th edition of his text Psychiatrie in 1910. Alzheimer published three further cases in 1909 and a "plaque-only" variant in 1911, which reexamination of the original specimens in 1993 showed to be a different stage of the same process, Alzheimer died in 1915, aged 51, soon after gaining the chair of psychiatry in Breslau, and long before his name became a household word. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22034141/

 

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Mitryendra80
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Interesting. It may be subtle things like how sunny or overcast the day is, and changes in air pressure. These things are known to affect cognition and can trigger headaches and mood changes in sensitive people, including those in a fragile state due to dementia. You have heard of "sundowning", where elderly dementia patients are more agitated and confused at the time of day when the light changes in the early evening?

Some healthy people think more clearly on sunny days.

Aspects to the planets of the mind, brain, and nervous system, like Moon, Mars, and Mercury are also changing regularly. If there is Vata imbalance, as there often is in old age, one would be more sensitive to such changes, as it is the most sensitive and changeable dosha and old age is the Vata time.

If a part of the body is severely inflamed, as the brain is in alzheimer's, then aspects to, and transits of, the planet related to that part of the body would become more sensitive and affected regularly.

It may also be affected by the moon's daily transit through each nakshatra with different effects. Or, if it is more rhythmic, each day that it moves to a new rashi, creating a different mood or avashtha to adjust to.

The elderly and those with dementia also have worse symptoms after the nights when they don't sleep well.

S.

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Ayan
 Ayan
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@mitryendra80

Thanks for the reply!

I also thought about the rhythms of the Moon, but interestingly, some acquaintances are close to Alzheimer's and can predict with a little error, for example, a month's condition - just because a good day is followed by a bad day and changes are often remarkably regular.

Unusually rhythmic, only small errors or rhythm changes may occur, but the patient's state of health changes very systematically alternately, one day is quite good, and is most likely followed by a day of worse condition, and then a day of much better condition.

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Manisha
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@ayan 

It sounds as if the body is working on a 48 hour cycle instead of a 24 hour one. 

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Ayan
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@manisha

Yes, if the regularity is very consistent, that the condition changes with exactly a few exceptions every day, such thoughts arise. It would be interesting to find some relationship that could be used to alleviate a human condition if such a consistent cycle is very stable, regardless of pharmacological drugs.

I have heard that such a cycle must be quite common in Alzheimer's.

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Manisha
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@ayan 

I haven’t studied much about Alzheimer’s, but memory loss and its retrieval is something I am looking at for personal reasons. Some of what I have read talks about the imbalances in the pineal gland. Circadian rhythms are one of its by-products (words are failing me now as I am still cogitating the information, but I hope I am making sense). I wonder if any research has been done about letting people with Alzheimer’s work with their own body rhythm and see if it stabilises and brings it back to the normal 24 hour cycle.

I don’t have any astrological stuff to say about this, but hopefully when I get to the Medical Astrology course, it will make more sense to me.

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Scott-M-19
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There is a yoga that I see in Kala when Sa and Mo are conjunct and aspected by Ma - this can cause dementia. Of course, one would have to look for many things to validate that though. 

 

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Mitryendra80
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@scott-m-19 Sadly this is true.

My relative that I am living with has a very close Sa-Mo conjunction in the 4th aspected by Mars from the 1st. Such an afflicted 4th can indicate a very difficult childhood home life (which he had) and lead to a very unpleasant old age/Saturn period.

He has the version of Parkinson's that is known for the most cognitive decline, and that very often leads to dementia. In fact he is reaching the stage and time where dementia most often manifests. He very often has bad short-term memory problems and executive dysfunction and, like me, has had severe ADHD and similar issues throughout his entire life.

 

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Scott-M-19
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@mitryendra80 

Thank you for sharing. 

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